What is Cyber Security?

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What is Cyber Security?

The Different Types of Cybersecurity

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Cyber security refers to every aspect of protecting an organization and its employees and assets against cyber threats. As cyberattacks become more common and sophisticated and corporate networks grow more complex, a variety of cyber security solutions are required to mitigate corporate cyber risk.

Network security is the practice of securing a computer network from intruders, whether targeted attackers or opportunistic malware.

Application security focuses on keeping software and devices free of threats. A compromised application could provide access to the data its designed to protect. Successful security begins in the design stage, well before a program or device is deployed.

Information security protects the integrity and privacy of data, both in storage and in transit.

Operational security includes the processes and decisions for handling and protecting data assets. The permissions users have when accessing a network and the procedures that determine how and where data may be stored or shared all fall under this umbrella.

Disaster recovery and business continuity define how an organization responds to a cyber-security incident or any other event that causes the loss of operations or data. Disaster recovery policies dictate how the organization restores its operations and information to return to the same operating capacity as before the event. Business continuity is the plan the organization falls back on while trying to operate without certain resources.

End-user education addresses the most unpredictable cyber-security factor: people. Anyone can accidentally introduce a virus to an otherwise secure system by failing to follow good security practices. Teaching users to delete suspicious email attachments, not plug in unidentified USB drives, and various other important lessons is vital for the security of any organization.

Common cyber threats

The latest cybersecurity threats are putting a new spin on “known” threats, taking advantage of work-from-home environments, remote access tools, and new cloud services. These evolving threats include:

Malware

The term “malware” refers to malicious software variants—such as worms, viruses, Trojans, and spyware—that provide unauthorized access or cause damage to a computer. Malware attacks are increasingly “fileless” and designed to get around familiar detection methods, such as antivirus tools, that scan for malicious file attachments.

Ransomware

Ransomware is a type of malware that locks down files, data or systems, and threatens to erase or destroy the data - or make private or sensitive data to the public - unless a ransom is paid to the cybercriminals who launched the attack. Recent ransomware attacks have targeted state and local governments, which are easier to breach than organizations and are under pressure to pay ransoms in order to restore applications and websites on which citizens rely.

Phishing / social engineering

Phishing is a form of social engineering that tricks users into providing their own PII or sensitive information. In phishing scams, emails or text messages appear to be from a legitimate company asking for sensitive information, such as credit card data or login information. The FBI has noted a surge in pandemic-related phishing, tied to the growth of remote work.

Insider threats

Current or former employees, business partners, contractors, or anyone who has had access to systems or networks in the past can be considered an insider threat if they abuse their access permissions. Insider threats can be invisible to traditional security solutions like firewalls and intrusion detection systems, which focus on external threats.

Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks

A DDoS attack attempts to crash a server, website or network by overloading it with traffic, usually from multiple coordinated systems. DDoS attacks overwhelm enterprise networks via the simple network management protocol (SNMP), used for modems, printers, switches, routers, and servers.

Advanced persistent threats (APTs)

In an APT, an intruder or group of intruders infiltrate a system and remain undetected for an extended period. The intruder leaves networks and systems intact so that the intruder can spy on business activity and steal sensitive data while avoiding the activation of defensive countermeasures. The recent Solar Winds breach of United States government systems is an example of an APT.

Man-in-the-middle attacks

Man-in-the-middle is an eavesdropping attack, where a cybercriminal intercepts and relays messages between two parties in order to steal data. For example, on an unsecured Wi-Fi network, an attacker can intercept data being passed between the guest’s device and the network.

Cyber safety tips - protect yourself against cyberattacks

How can businesses and individuals guard against cyber threats? Here are our top cyber safety tips:

  1. Update your software and operating system: This means you benefit from the latest security patches.

  2. Use anti-virus software: Security solutions like Kaspersky Total Security will detect and removes threats. Keep your software updated for the best level of protection.

  3. Use strong passwords: Ensure your passwords are not easily guessable.

  4. Do not open email attachments from unknown senders: These could be infected with malware.

  5. Do not click on links in emails from unknown senders or unfamiliar websites: This is a common way that malware is spread.

  6. Avoid using unsecured WiFi networks in public places: Unsecured networks leave you vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks.

Resources

What Is Cyber Security: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inWWhr5tnEA

Types of Cyber Attacks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dk-ZqQ-bfy4